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Athletes endure extreme temperatures as heat cuts New York triathlon

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New York City triathletes braved the scorching heat on Sunday as the heat wave continued to bake the Big Apple, but some competitors shrugged off the extreme weather.

Race organizers have reduced the bike portion from 24.8 miles to 12.4 miles and the running portion from 10.2 miles to 2.5 miles due to the extreme heat, which has now entered its sixth day.

Brazilian native Danilo Pimentel, who won the men’s event, told The Post that the race went off without a hitch.

“I was born in the Amazon, this heat is normal! I do not need preparation for these conditions,” said the 35-year-old man.

“They performed very well, the track is really difficult, ups and downs,” he said of his competitors.

Women’s Pro winner Amy Simerman of Rochester admitted, “To be honest, I felt a little hot.”

But the 30-year-old pro said he was ready for boiling temperatures.

“I was hydrated with water and electrolytes all the time and I was in bed at 7:30 yesterday!” she said.

However, she noted, “I’d like 10,000, I won’t lie.”

Athletes compete in the triathlon in New York on Sunday in front of spectators.
Getty Images for Life
A young athlete is sick from the heat at the Finnish track of the New York Triathlon in Central Park.  New York.  Manhattan.  New York, NY July 24, 2022 nypostinhouse (Kevin S. Downes for The New York Post.
A young athlete is sick from the heat at the finish line of the New York triathlon in Central Park.
Kevin S. Downes for The New York Post
Nicole Falcaro celebrates third place in the women's triathlon in New York.
Nicole Falcaro celebrates third place in the women’s triathlon in New York.
Getty Images for Life

The athletes went to the races on Sunday at 6:30 am – 40 minutes later than the scheduled start time – when the temperature was already below eighty degrees.

“Despite the disappointment in the shortened duration of both races, our number one priority is to do everything we can to ensure the safety and well-being of our competitors, volunteers, medical staff and spectators,” the New York City Triathlon announced via Facebook. post on Thursday.

The decision comes two months after the runner died after finishing the Brooklyn Half Marathon on an unseasonably warm morning, and three years after the annual Big Apple Triathlon was canceled entirely due to the heat.

Tim Cranston, 68, who traveled to the race from Denver, Colorado, complained that the duration of the race had been shortened.

Amy Simerman, 30, Rochester, NY.
Women’s Pro winner Amy Simerman of Rochester admitted, “To be honest, I felt a little hot.”
Danilo Pimentel, 35, Brazil
Brazilian native Danilo Pimentel, who won the men’s event, told The Post that the race went off without a hitch.

“Too bad they cut it in half! It started 40 minutes late and there was no current for the swim, which made it difficult, but more than half of the athletes were beginners and I didn’t see anyone wrestling there,” the pensioner said.

“I definitely think they made a mistake, everyone could handle the full distance, definitely.”

Alex Kneselak, a graphic designer based in Fort Lee, New Jersey, told The Post: “The heat wasn’t as bad as I thought.”

Pictured: New York Triathlon 2022.
The organizers of the race have reduced the cycling part from 24.8 to 12.4 miles, and the running part from 10.2 to 2.5 miles.
GNMiller/NYPost
Pictured: New York Triathlon 2022.
On Sunday, New York triathletes braved the scorching heat as the heatwave continued to bake the Big Apple.
GNMiller/NYPost
Athletes enter the water during a triathlon in New York on Sunday.
Athletes enter the water during a triathlon in New York on Sunday.
GNMiller/NYPost

“Nice morning this morning,” said the 51-year-old.

However, he added that it was “a good idea that they cut it.”

Eliza Salpeter, 55, a Nassau County sales representative, expressed relief that the race had been cut short.

“I was glad it was downsized, I was worried about the heat. I took gels, stopped at every water station in order to be in time in this heat. But to be honest, it was hot!” Salpeter, 55, told The Post. “I think it was a smart move to cut it.”

Arnaud Broet, the owner of a construction company and based in Manhattan, was also grateful that he had to spend less time in the scorching sun.

Some triathletes said it was a mistake to shorten the race because of the heat.
Getty Images for Life

“It was so hot! I’m glad they cut it. At first I was very upset that they cut it, but because of the heat, my legs cramped on the running part, and if they hadn’t cut it, I would have been in real trouble,” said Broe, 40.

Blaise Barron, a 54-year-old IT professional, said: “The heat was unbearable!”

“It was a good call,” an Upper West Side resident told The Post. “I saw one or two [people] get medical attention because they fell, but I didn’t see a single person really suffering from a heat wave or in a crisis, so they did the right thing.”

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